Collector cabinet

Caroline Notté’s Gallery

 

Caroline Notté sets up her notebooks and pencils in the former Uccle’s workshop of Louis-Herman de Koninck. They are some lucky coincidences, The Master of rational architecture and veil of concrete will now host Caroline’s Atelier, source and showcase of her inspirations.

When she comes to the final touch, the accessory becomes essential: the French lamps from Sammode, an elegant industrial lighting with both horizontal and vertical sets, hard metals and soft sources; the Vignoli’s potteries, a kaleidoscope of curved colours, are reflected in the rectilinear patterns of a Mille & Claire’s plaid. The black and beige circles of a ceramics trio by Ettore Sottsass echo the black and silver streaks of another trio of metal tables by Armand Jonckers as a reminiscence of Daniel Buren’s columns.

Caroline has woven around her a whole lace of links and inspirations: the rugs of the world by Michel Antoine and their colour pools, the sculptural furniture by Pol Quadens, a real artistic and technological achievement. Her emotional ties with photography express themselves with the exhibition of Benoît Feron’s artworks, adjacent to the talentuous work of Céline Nassaux who covers the walls with gold and silver leaves. She combines Leoti’s know-how and experience in stylish furniture. Finally, thanks to Ressource Painting, she offers an inexhaustible source of shades.

She supports those who rely on her from the very first glances, exchanges and drafts to all stages of construction, until recreating an interior, a home.

For her clients Caroline Notté moves heaven and earth, and everything is inhabited. To welcome us. In broad daylight…

The master of rational architecture and veil of concrete will now house the Atelier de Caroline, source and showcase of her inspirations.

When she comes to the finishing touches, the accessory becomes essential: the French fixtures from Sammode, an elegant industrial lighting, with both horizontal and vertical sets, hard metals and soft sources; the Vignoli potteries, a kaleidoscope of curved colors, are reflected in the rectilinear patterns of a Mille & Claire throw. The black and beige circles of a ceramics trio by Ettore Sottsass echo the black and silver streaks of another trio of metal tables by Armand Jonckers, reminiscent of columns by Buren.